JagNewsOnline.com

  • June 7Soph. Registration - Aug. 3rd

  • January 24Senior Registration - Aug. 1st

  • January 24Junior Registration - Aug. 2nd

Some closure found in MSU case

Illustration by Colton Robertson

Illustration by Colton Robertson

Patterson Fallis, Managing Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






For nearly 20 years, Larry Nassar was a highly sought-after sports medicine physician who worked for Michigan State University Athletics, but he will now spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Earlier this month, Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 125 years in prison for years of sexual abuse after upwards of 200 women said in court that he sexually assaulted them, over the past two decades. That sentence will run alongside his sentence of 40 to 175 years for pleading guilty to seven counts of criminal sexual assault after another 60-year sentence for child pornography is served. All in all, Nassar will serve a minimum of 100 years in prison, and at the age of 54, is essentially serving a life sentence and will undoubtedly die in prison.

Since news broke about Nassar in 2016, Michigan State has denied any wrongdoing on their end, yet many high-level university officials have resigned or have been forced out of their jobs since the allegations came to the public eye. Among those people are Michigan State President Lou Anna Simon, Athletic Director Mark Hollis, and William Strampel, who was formerly the dean of MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine and had been named in lawsuits against the university.

At Nassar’s sentencing in Eaton County, Michigan, he issued the following statement regarding the years of sexual assault.

“(The victim-impact statements) have impacted me to my innermost core. With that being said, I understand and acknowledge that it pales in comparison to the pain, trauma and emotions that you all are feeling. It’s impossible to convey the depth and breadth of how sorry I am to each and everyone involved. The visions of your testimonies will forever be present in my thoughts,” Nassar said.

The judge presiding over his case in Eaton County, Janice Cunningham, talked about the reasoning for the length of his sentence.

“I am not convinced that you truly understand that what you did was wrong and the devastating impact you’ve had on the victims, family and friends,” Cunningham said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Showcase

    Get To Know: Dwila Funk

  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Showcase

    Students donate to food drive for Community Unity Week

  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Entertainment

    Video game and anime club draws a crowd

  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Showcase

    Football player, Student Senate president named August students of the month

  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Showcase

    Air Force JROTC cadets recognized at decoration ceremony

  • Showcase

    Taylor Swift concert at Arrowhead does not disappoint

  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Showcase

    ROTC cadets march to memorialize Bataan death march

  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Showcase

    Getting to Know: Officer Jon Mitchell

  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Showcase

    Associate principal heads to the Freshman Center

  • Some closure found in MSU case

    Features

    Jaguar Pride performs in Washington D.C.

The student media site of Blue Springs South High School
Some closure found in MSU case